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Dec 27, 2016

Carl Sagan

Filming Contact in 1996
This year I've been honoring a series of temporal milestones...
200 - Frankenstein
150 - H. G. Wells
100 - Jack Vance
75 - Reason
50 - Star Trek
30 - Carl Sagan

Carl Sagan
When Carl Sagan died 30 years ago, at the age of 62, I was dismayed. The following year, the film Contact was released, and it became a sad reminder that Carl was gone: he would not be able to push for the needed sequel... a video exploration of the possibility that we humans -indeed, the entire world as we know it- had been created.

the Exode Saga
Last year, I conceived the idea that Carl Sagan had been designed and created by Interventionists. Since then, I've planned to include Star Dance in the Exode Saga.

Our Reality Chain
The structure of the Exode Saga is built around the 5 Realities shown here (to the left). I skip over the Malansohn Reality (it was the subject of Asimov's Story, The End of Eternity) and all the other Realities that came between the First Reality and the Foundation Reality.

Teleportation in the Gaean Reach.
Original cover art by Leslie Edwards and
Virgil Finlay.
One version of the "future history" of the Foundation Reality was told by Isaac Asimov in his stories that were set in his Foundation Fictional Universe. Similarly, the "future history" of the Asimov Reality was told by Jack Vance in his stories about the Gaean Reach.

Special thanks to Miranda Hedman (www.mirish.deviantart.com) for the DeviantArt stock photograph "Black Cat 9 - stock" that I used to create the green "sedronite" who is in the image showntothe right. 

Teleportation
Fru'wu
I've long imagined that in the Ekcolir Reality, the science fiction genre was crafted so as to prepare Earthlings for First Contact with the Fru'wu. Also, the Ekcolir Reality would have been the perfect place for a Contact television series.

Teleportus Interruptus. Original
cover art by Edmund Emshwiller
(and see this cover also).
I've never described the First Contact event with the Fru'wu. Today, Yōd was telling me about the archives of the Writers Block which contain an account of how the Contact television show was crafted. Apparently the Fru'Wu were "discovered" in the Ekcolir Reality; they did not simple arrive in our Solar System in the same way that the Buld spaceship arrived from out of the depths of space here in the Final Reality. Yōd has not taken time to explore the details, but she assures me that teleportation was involved in First Contact between the Fru'wu and Earthlings.

Deeper Time
In the Ekcolir Reality. Original
cover art by Edmund Emshwiller and
also see this cover.
Ivory Fersoni provided an account (see this blog post) of some science fiction stories that were published in the Ekcolir Reality which may have hinted at how Earthlings first traveled to the stars in the Asimov Reality. Ivory's stories emphasized a sedron-powered interstellar space drive, but Zeta believes there was also use of short-range (and risky) teleporter technology during the early space age in the Asimov Reality.

When spacecraft became cheap and ubiquitous, the unreliable teleporter technology was abandoned. Yōd suggests that it is possible that some elements of Sagan's novel Contact are echoes of events in the Asimov Reality, particularly the use of long-range teleportation by Genesaunts.

Carl Sagan's replicoid in the Hierion Domain
In the archives of the Writers Block, Zeta has found suggestions that teleporter technology was used in the Asimov Reality for duplicating some valuable objects, including people.

Yōd adds, "The temporal momentum system of the positronic robots was basically an application of teleportation-mediated duplication technology to objects in the Hierion Domain."

I continue to search for a clear understanding of exactly why Carl Sagan had to be created and deployed within the Final Reality and why he has to be taken away from this world at such a young age.

Contact television series.
Related Reading
Worlds in Collision
Contact 30
Creating Carl
Cosmos

Next: the Bimanoid Interface
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