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Oct 3, 2015

Dyagys and Atossu

In my previous blog post, I shared some information that I recently obtained from Gohrlay about the history of the science fiction genre in Deep Time. In particular, I was intrigued by The Space Gods, one of the novels written by Thanu Millard in the Ekcolir Reality, which provided Earthlings with an account of the pek and Kac'hin.

In a follow-up conversation, Gohrlay and I were discussing a popular topic for science fiction authors in the Ekcolir Reality: the idea that we humans were crafted and created by aliens. I mentioned the story called "Planet of the Gods" that Gohrlay had already told me about last spring. Now, Gohrlay finally admitted that she had previously allowed me to incorrectly assume that the analogue of Robert Moore Williams in the Ekcolir Reality was male.

original cover art by
Edmund Emshwiller
According to Gohrlay, Moore's analogue in that Reality was actually a woman named Roberta Moore Williams (she sometimes used the shorter pen name, Roberta Moore). In the Ekcolir Reality, Roberta wrote a series of novels about the Observers and Overseers who watched over Earth.

Apparently Roberta wrote extensively about Thomas. Somehow, she was aware of the practice of making "Thomas clones", which apparently began in the Ekcolir Reality.

As mentioned previously, I long ago received some infites (information nanites) that originated with Roberta in the Ekcolir Reality. However, I suspect that Roberta's replicoid has "curated" those infites, selectively giving me access to their information content at various points in time through the course of my life. Roberta (in the Ekcolir Reality) and her replicoid (here in the Final Reality) seem to have been obsessed with the clones of Thomas. According to Gohrlay, Roberta had contact with a Thomas clone in the 20th century of the Ekcolir Reality. Using time travel technology, many clones of Thomas were made far in Roberta's past and one of them was deployed as an Interventionist agent on Earth during Roberta's life time.

Dyagys was one of the "Thomas clones".
According to Gohrlay, here in the Buld Reality, Roberta's replicoid apparently coordinated her activities with with those of Betty. Through "her" contact with Betty, Roberta's replicoid became familiar with the many Thomas clones who served as Interventionist agents here in the Final Reality. I've previously blogged about some of the Thomas clones who carried out missions on Earth in this Reality: Rechmain, Rathuf, Humget, Thrukta and Parthney. Dyagys was another "Thomas clone" who lived on Earth about 2,500 years ago. Apparently Dyagys worked on Earth in coordination with a Grendel (who is known in Earth's history as Empedocles) and Maghy. According to Gohrlay, Dyagys became intimately involved with Atossu, a princess of the mysterious Median Empire.

science fiction written by replicoids...
I asked Gohrlay about other science fiction authors of the Ekcolir Reality that she and I have previously discussed and just how many of them I was allowed to falsely assume were male in that Reality. She replied "several" and did not want to go into the details. I don't know why, after having already having told me so much, but she is still reluctant to tell me everything that she knows about the Ekcolir Reality.

Apparently Interventionist agents such as Empedocles, Maghy and Dyagys were allowed to be quite aggressive in their actions on Earth when it suited the purposes of Grean. According to Gohrlay, Princess Atossu was actually another Interventionist agent from Luk'ru.

source
According to Gohrlay, Zoroastrianism was the dominant religion of Western culture in the Ekcolir Reality. Maghy, Atossu and Dyagys were instrumental in triggering a shift from Zoroastrianism to the Abrahamic religions. Apparently Maghy made possible the building of the Second Temple in Jerusalem. Thus, the Atossu Intervation was part of the complex Reality Change that ended the Ekcolir Reality and created the world as we know it.

Next: can Gohrlay narrate the Exode Trilogy?
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